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Incidence of eyelid basal cell carcinoma in England: 2000–2010
  1. George M Saleh1,2,
  2. Parul Desai1,
  3. J Richard O Collin1,
  4. Alexander Ives3,
  5. Tim Jones3,
  6. Badrul Hussain1
  1. 1Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK
  2. 2NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Moorfields Eye Hospital, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK
  3. 3Knowledge and Intelligence Team (South West), Public Health England, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to George M Saleh, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Moorfields Eye Hospital, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, 162 City Road, London EC1V 2PD, UK; george.saleh{at}moorfields.nhs.uk

Abstract

Introduction Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the most frequently diagnosed type of skin cancer, with eyelid (including canthus) BCCs accounting for a notable proportion of these. Using population-based data from the English Cancer Registries, we report here the incidence of eyelid BCCs in England, for the period 2000–2010.

Methods ICD-10 and histology codes for eyelid BCCs (including canthus) from the English National Cancer Data Repository were used to identify incident events. Crude incidence rates by age and sex, together with directly standardised incidence rates for eyelid BCCs in England in 3-year cohorts, are presented, in keeping with the reporting practice of the English Cancer Registries.

Results Over the 11-year study period, there were a total of 33 610 recorded eyelid BCCs; 18 146 in females and 15 464 in males. There were regional variations in registrations. Incidence of eyelid BCCs increased with age. No major change in the age-standardised incidence of BCC was observed during the period 2000–2010. Overall, the age-standardised incidence of BCCs during 2008–2010 was similar for males and females (4.51 per 100 000 (95% CI 4.37 to 4.65) and 4.53 per 100 000 (95% CI 4.40 to 4.67), respectively). However, females under 50 years of age had higher incidence rates, and males over 75 years of age had higher rates.

Conclusions The findings provide the current frequency and distribution of eyelid BCCs in England, highlighting opportunities for health education and improving reporting and registration of events, and for informing service planning.

  • Eye Lids
  • Pathology
  • Public health
  • Epidemiology
  • Neoplasia

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GS, PD and BH: conception and design of the work, analysis and interpretation of data for important intellectual content, final approval of the version published. Agreement to be accountable. JROC: design of work, interpretation of data for important intellectual content, final approval of the version published. Agreement to be accountable. AI and TJ: design of the work, the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, drafting the work for important intellectual content, final approval of the version published. Agreement to be accountable.

  • Funding This work was part supported by the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology through an award by the Department of Health.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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