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Clinical features of uveitis in children and adolescents at a tertiary referral centre in Tokyo
  1. Hiroshi Keino1,
  2. Takayo Watanabe1,
  3. Wakako Taki1,
  4. Makiko Nakayama1,
  5. Tomoko Nakamura1,2,
  6. Kunimasa Yan3,
  7. Annabelle A Okada1
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, Toyama University School of Medicine, Toyama, Japan
  3. 3Department of Pediatrics, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Annabelle A Okada, Department of Ophthalmology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan; aokada{at}eye-center.org

Abstract

Objectives To analyse clinical features, systemic associations, treatment and visual outcomes of uveitis in children and adolescents at a tertiary centre in Tokyo.

Methods Clinical records of 64 patients under the age of 20 years who presented between 2001 and 2013 to the Ocular Inflammation Service of the Kyorin Eye Center, Tokyo were reviewed retrospectively.

Results Of the 64 patients, there was a predominance of girls (70%) and bilateral disease (81%). Mean age at presentation was 12.9 years (4–19 years). Mean follow-up was 46 months (3–144 months). Anterior uveitis was present in 56.3% of patients, panuveitis in 28.1% and posterior uveitis in 15.6%. No patients had intermediate uveitis. The most common diagnostic designation was unclassified uveitis (57.8%). Systemic associations were observed in 10.9% and no patients were diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ocular complications were observed in 71.9% of patients, including optic disc hyperemia/oedema (40.6%), vitreous opacification (23.4%), posterior synechia (18.7%), increased intraocular pressure (17.1%) and cataract (14.1%). Six patients underwent intraocular surgery, five for cataract extraction and two for glaucoma control. Twelve patients (18.7%) received some form of systemic therapy either corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs or biologic agents. The percentage of eyes with a visual acuity of 1.0 or better was 87.1% at baseline, 91.3% at 6 months, 89.6% at 12 months and 87.5% at 36 months.

Conclusions The majority of children and adolescents who presented to us with uveitis had bilateral disease and no systemic disease associations. Only one-fifth of patients required systemic therapy to control their ocular inflammation, and most eyes had a good visual outcome.

  • Child health (paediatrics)
  • Inflammation

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