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Br J Ophthalmol 87:946-948 doi:10.1136/bjo.87.8.946
  • Clinical science
    • Scientific reports

Effect of a tight necktie on intraocular pressure

  1. C Teng1,
  2. R Gurses-Ozden2,5,
  3. J M Liebmann3,4,
  4. C Tello2,4,5,
  5. R Ritch2,5
  1. 1SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY, USA
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, USA
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USA
  4. 4Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
  5. 5Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Robert Ritch, MD, Glaucoma Service, Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 310 E 14th Street, New York, NY 10003, USA; ritchmd{at}earthlink.net
  • Accepted 6 December 2002

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the effect of a tight necktie on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement using Goldmann applanation tonometry.

Methods: 40 eyes of 20 normal subjects and 20 open angle glaucoma patients (all male) were enrolled. IOP was measured with an open shirt collar, 3 minutes after placing a tight necktie, and 3 minutes after loosening it. All measurements were made by the same examiner.

Results: Mean IOP in normal subjects increased by 2.6 (SD 3.9) mm Hg (p=0.008, paired t test; range −3 to +14 mm Hg) and in glaucoma patients by 1.0 (1.8) mm Hg (p=0.02, paired t test; range −2 to +4.5 mm Hg). In normal subjects, IOP in 12 eyes was increased by ⩾2 mm Hg and in seven eyes by ⩾4 mm Hg. In glaucoma patients, IOP in six eyes was increased by ⩾2 mm Hg and in two eyes by ⩾4 mm Hg.

Conclusion: A tight necktie increases IOP in both normal subjects and glaucoma patients and could affect the diagnosis and management of glaucoma.

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