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Acute unilateral conjunctivitis after rubella vaccination: the detection of the rubella genome in the inflamed conjunctiva by reverse transcriptase-polymerase–chain reaction
  1. N Kitaichi1,
  2. T Ariga1,
  3. S Ohno1,
  4. T Shimizu2
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan
  2. 2Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan
  1. Correspondence to: N Kitaichi Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N-15, W-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan; nobukita{at}med.hokudai.ac.jp

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The efficacy of long-term rubella vaccine is >90%, and the anti-rubella vaccination causes few side effects.1 Some cases of anterior uveitis were reported after a combined vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, but not when vaccination for rubella alone was administered.2 Another study reported that, after smallpox vaccination, 16 out of 450 000 subjects vaccinated had ocular complaints including conjunctivitis, keratitis and eyelid oedema, and only 5 of those cases were confirmed positive for vaccinia by culture or PCR.3 However, conjunctivitis after rubella vaccination with laboratory confirmation has never been reported.

Case report

A 43-year-old man was referred to the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan, with a history of conjunctival redness in his left eye for 2 …

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