Article Text

PDF
Terson’s syndrome: surgical outcome in relation to entry site pathology
  1. S Murjaneh1,
  2. J E Hale2,
  3. S Mishra3,
  4. R H Ling3,
  5. P R Simcock3
  1. 1West of England Eye Unit, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (Wonford) NHS Trust, Exeter, UK
  2. 2Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, UK
  3. 3West of England Eye Unit, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (Wonford) NHS Trust, Exeter, UK
  1. Correspondence to: P R Simcock West of England Eye Unit, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (Wonford) NHS Trust, Barrack Road, Exeter EX2 5DW, UK; psimcock{at}hotmail.com

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Terson’s syndrome is a frequent cause of visual loss following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).1 Vitrectomy is indicated for non-resolving vitreous haemorrhage.2,3 We observed a high incidence of entry site (ES) pathology in patients having vitrectomy for Terson’s syndrome and recommend routine prophylactic laser or cryotherapy to all entry sites in these patients.

CASE SERIES

A case note review identified 11 eyes of eight consecutive patients with Terson’s syndrome (age range 27–56 years, M:F = 1:1) referred to the West of England Eye Unit between 1996 and 2004. Surgery was performed for non-resolving vitreous haemorrhage 1–6 months from date of referral. Ten eyes had three port pars plana vitrectomy and one eye had combined phacovitrectomy.

Table 1 summarises the preoperative and postoperative Snellen visual acuity (VA), type of anaesthesia, whether surgery was complicated …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.