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Long term results of primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for congenital cataract in the first year of life
  1. P Gouws,
  2. H M Hussin,
  3. R H C Markham
  1. Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol Eye Hospital Lower Maudlin Street Bristol BS1 2LX, UK
  1. Correspondence to: MrRichard Markham Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol Eye Hospital Lower Maudlin Street Bristol BS1 2LX, UK; markham1{at}btinternet.com

Abstract

Aim: To document the long term outcome of congenital cataract surgery with primary posterior chamber (PC) lens implantation in the first year of life.

Method: A retrospective review of congenital cataract surgery in the first year of life with PC lens implantation in 18 infants, eight with unilateral and 10 with bilateral cataract. The average age at surgery was 15 weeks (range 3–44 weeks). The mean follow up was 95 months (range 60–139 months).

Results: The best outcomes were in the bilateral group where 50% of eyes achieved 6/18 or better, with a best acuity of 6/9. Acuities were poor in the unilateral group where only 38% achieved 6/60 or better, with a best acuity of 6/24. There was a mean refractive shift between first refraction after surgery and refraction at 36 months after surgery of −3.44 dioptres with a very wide range (+2.00 to −15.50). There was a significantly greater myopic shift in the unilateral cases. Many eyes in both groups continued to show an increasing myopic shift between 36 months after surgery and their final recorded refraction. The main complications were amblyopia, especially in unilateral cataracts, and posterior capsular opacification. Amblyopia was most probably related to a combination of early onset of dense cataract in this young age group, late presentation for initial surgery, delay in capsulotomies, and imperfect compliance with a rigorous occlusion regime.

Conclusion: Intraocular lens implantation in infants less than 1 year of age is generally a safe procedure. The spread of final refractive error was very wide. Final refraction in the unilateral group was significantly more myopic than the bilateral group. Final acuities were often disappointing especially in the unilateral group.

  • IOL, intraocular lens
  • PC, posterior chamber
  • cataract surgery
  • paediatrics
  • lens implant
  • congenital
  • IOL, intraocular lens
  • PC, posterior chamber
  • cataract surgery
  • paediatrics
  • lens implant
  • congenital

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests: none.

  • Approval for this study was obtained from the Central and South Bristol Research Ethics Committee, UBHT Headquarters, Marlborough Street, Bristol BS1 3NU, UK.

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