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Centripetal retinal capillary proliferation in idiopathic parafoveolar telangiectasis
  1. Hideki Koizumi1,
  2. Michael J Cooney1,
  3. Anita Leys2,
  4. Richard F Spaide3
  1. 1
    The Vitreous, Retina, and Macula Consultants of New York, and the LuEsther T. Mertz Retinal Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USA
  2. 2
    Department of Ophthalmology, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen, Leuven, Belgium
  3. 3
    The Vitreous, Retina, and Macula Consultants of New York, and the LuEsther T. Mertz Retinal Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USA
  1. Dr Richard F Spaide, 460 Park Ave, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10022, USA; rickspaide{at}yahoo.com

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We report two cases with idiopathic parafoveolar telangiectasis (IPT) that showed a deep invasion of perifoveal capillaries within the substance of the fovea, obliterating the foveal avascular zone. All four eyes revealed characteristic findings of IPT, but demonstrated a deep layer of telangiectatic capillaries occupying the expected region of the foveal avascular zone, with retention of relatively good visual acuity. These cases indicate that the control of capillary growth in patients with IPT is defective, but the presence of vessels alone does not cause a marked decrease in visual acuity.

IPT is an acquired retinal disorder consisting of bilateral deep proliferation of telangiectatic perifoveal capillaries through the depth of the parafoveolar macula, and also centripetally to an extent—in that patients with IPT have smaller foveal avascular zones (FAZs) than normal patients.1 We report two patients with IPT who showed a deep invasion of perifoveal …

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