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Severe diffuse lamellar keratitis after femtosecond lamellar keratectomy
  1. Jaime Javaloy1,
  2. Alberto Artola1,
  3. María T Vidal1,
  4. Gonzalo Muñoz1,
  5. Victoria de Rojas2,
  6. Jorge L Alió3
  1. 1Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, VISSUM, Instituto Oftalmológico de Alicante, School of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain
  2. 2Fundación Instituto Galego de Oftalmoloxía, Santiago de Compostela University, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain
  3. 3Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, VISSUM, Instituto Oftalmológico de Alicante, School of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain
  1. Correspondence to: Dr J Javaloy Instituto Oftalmológico de Alicante, Avda Denia, sn Edificio VISSUM, Alicante, Spain; jjavaloy{at}coma.es

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A femtosecond laser microkeratome is becoming a popular device for performing lamellar cuts before laser ablation during laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery, achieving good refractive outcomes and a low rate of complications.1–5

Inflammatory reactions at the interface after using a femtosecond laser for creating lamellar cuts have been communicated at ophthalmology meetings but not yet published in papers. We present a case of severe diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) after using IntraLase (IntraLase Corp, Irvine, CA) for performing LASIK surgery.

Case report

A 32-year-old Caucasian male patient attended our clinic for refractive surgery. He had non-relevant medical or ocular history. The preoperative cicloplegic refraction was right eye, −1.25 sph, −1 cyl×80° visual acuity = 1 (decimal scale); left eye, −1.25 sph, −1.75 cyl×90° visual acuity = 1. Pachymetry …

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