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Choroidal osteoma in association with Stargardt’s dystrophy
  1. Edwin C Figueira1,
  2. R Max Conway2,
  3. Ian C Francis3
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Chatswood Grove Eye Clinic, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to: Dr I C Francis Chatswood Grove Eye Clinic, Suite 12, Chatswood Grove, 12–14 Malvern Avenue, Chatswood, Sydney, 2067, NSW, Australia; ifrancis{at}student.unsw.edu.au

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Choroidal osteoma usually occurs in 20–30 year old, healthy, white women as a well-defined, unilateral (75%), solitary, yellow orange, slow-growing juxtapapillary lesion.1 This is the first time that a choroidal osteoma has been associated with Stargardt’s dystrophy.

Case report

A 16-year-old girl presented with bilateral reduction of distance visual acuity (6/24) since 2 years. Near vision, colour vision, stereoacuity and anterior segments of both eyes were normal. Amsler grid testing in the left eye revealed a blur of the grid superotemporal to the foveal fixation point. Stereoscopic funduscopy revealed bilateral Stargardt’s maculopathy (foveolar pigment epithelial changes with parafoveal orange-coloured flecks; figs 1A,B), with an approximately 2.5 mm yellowish subretinal lesion situated 2-disc diameters below the left optic disc (fig 1B). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed macular and perimacular hypofluorescence (dark choroid) with hyperfluorescence and late …

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