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Posture, intraocular pressure and visual function
  1. John H K Liu,
  2. Robert N Weinreb
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr John H K Liu, Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0946, USA; joliu{at}ucsd.edu

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For several decades, there has been no consensus among experts on the magnitude of postural influence on intraocular pressure (IOP). An early report observed a mean IOP difference between sitting and supine body positions was only 0.3 mm Hg in glaucoma patients using the Goldmann tonometer.1 For those who accepted this finding of a very small postural IOP difference, it seemed likely that outside the office hours, a sitting IOP value would be similar to what obtained in the supine position. Other early reports indicated that the mean IOP differences after a similar postural change with Goldmann tonometry were significantly larger in the range of 2.2–4.7 mm Hg.2 Some thought that a larger postural IOP difference could be relevant to the optic nerve damage of glaucoma.

Recent work in our laboratory has repeatedly confirmed that mean postural IOP (pneumatonometer) …

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