Article Text

PDF
Intermediate uveitis in children and young adults: differences in clinical course, associations and visual outcome
  1. Carsten Heinz1,2,
  2. Saskia Schoonbrood1,
  3. Arnd Heiligenhaus1,2
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, St. Franziskus-Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Duisburg- Essen, Germany
  1. Correspondence to Dr Carsten Heinz, Department of Ophthalmology, St. Franziskus-Hospital Muenster, Hohenzollernring 74, Muenster 48145, Germany; carsten.heinz{at}uveitis-zentrum.de

Abstract

Aim Intermediate uveitis (IU) is considered to carry a considerable risk for complications and visual loss. This study compares juvenile and adult onset IU with regard to visual loss and complications.

Methods Single-centre retrospective analysis of 110 consecutive children with onset of IU at the age of ≤16 years compared with 107 consecutive adult patients (17–35 years). All patients were followed for ≥1 year (mean 2.5±2.3 years).

Results Average age at first uveitis diagnosis in children (65 boys; 59%) was 9.7±3.17 years and in adults was 24.3±4.92 years (36 men; 34%; p=0.003). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in both groups was similar at first and last presentation. Compared with initial presentation, BCVA improved in 31% of children and 21% of adults during the follow-up period, while it worsened in 9% and 8.7%, respectively. Lyme disease in children (8%) and multiple sclerosis in adults (17%) were the most frequent systemic associations. Poor visual acuity at first presentation, snowbanks and vitreoretinal traction were associated with a higher risk for poor BCVA at last presentation. In children, cataract formation (OR 7.6; 95% CI 1.7 to 33.8) and macular oedema (13.6; 1.6 to 113.5) and in adults posterior synechiae (7.3; 1.8 to 30.2), cataract formation (19.02; 2.31 to 156.56), macular epiretinal membrane (5.1; 1.02 to 25.28) and retinal detachment (8.4; 1.4 to 51.2) were associated with poor BCVA during follow-up. Uveitis course was not worse if associated systemic disease was present.

Conclusions IU with onset in childhood and early adulthood showed a similar visual course at intermediate follow-up. Associated diseases and complication patterns differed between children and young adults.

  • Inflammation
  • Child health (paediatrics)
  • Immunology

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.