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Long-term ocular complications in aphakic versus pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis
  1. K M Sijssens1,
  2. L I Los2,
  3. A Rothova1,
  4. P A W J F Schellekens1,
  5. P van de Does1,
  6. J S Stilma1,
  7. H J de Boer1
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to Karen M Sijssens, Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Utrecht, E.03.136, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands; K.Sijssens{at}umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

Aim To evaluate the long-term follow-up of aphakic and pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis with a special interest in whether intraocular lens implantation increases the risk of developing ocular complications.

Methods Data were obtained from the medical records of 29 children (48 eyes) with JIA-associated uveitis operated on for cataract before the age of 16 years from January 1990 up to and including March 2007. Main outcome measures were long-term postsurgical complications and visual acuity in aphakic and pseudophakic eyes of children with JIA-associated uveitis.

Results The number of complications after cataract extraction including new onset of ocular hypertension and secondary glaucoma, cystoid macular oedema and optic disc swelling did not differ between aphakic and pseudophakic eyes. Moreover, no hypotony, perilenticular membranes and phthisis were encountered in the pseudophakic group. Better visual acuity was observed in the pseudophakic eyes up to and including 7 years of follow-up (p=0.012 at 7 years of follow-up). No differences in the preoperative or adjuvant perioperative treatment with periocular or systemic corticosteroids were found between the two groups; however, significantly more children were treated with methotrexate in the pseudophakic group (p=0.006).

Conclusion With maximum control of perioperative inflammation and intensive follow-up, the implantation of an intraocular lens in well-selected eyes of children with JIA-associated uveitis is not associated with an increased risk of ocular hypertension, secondary glaucoma, cystoid macular oedema and optic disc swelling and showed better visual results up to and including 7 years after cataract extraction.

  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • uveitis, cataract extraction, intraocular lens, pseudophakic, aphakic

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Footnotes

  • Funding KMS was supported by the Dr FP Fischer Foundation, The Netherlands.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study followed the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by our institutional review board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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