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Br J Ophthalmol doi:10.1136/bjophthalmol-2011-300985
  • Clinical science

Mooren's ulcer in children

  1. Virender Sangwan1
  1. 1Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
  2. 2Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Vijayawada, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jatin Ashar, Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Kode Venkatadri Campus, Vijayawada 521137, India; jatinashar{at}yahoo.com
  1. Contributors VS designed and conducted the study; AM and JA were responsible for data collection, management, analysis and interpretation; AM, JA and VS contributed to the preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.

  • Accepted 20 February 2012
  • Published Online First 18 March 2012

Abstract

Purpose To describe the epidemiology, clinical features, management and outcomes of paediatric Mooren's peripheral ulcerative keratitis.

Methods All patients with Mooren's ulcer aged <18 years presenting at a single centre from 1987 to 2010 were enrolled. Epidemiological features, symptomatology, clinical signs, disease severity, investigations, treatment, outcomes and complications were studied. Main outcome measures were anatomical and functional outcomes, disease activity and complications.

Results 14 eyes of 11 children (seven males and four females with an average age of 12.45±2.25 years at presentation) with Mooren's ulcer were included. Eight cases were unilateral and three bilateral. Symptoms at presentation were more severe than in adults. Trauma was the commonest predisposing factor. Eight eyes had severe corneal involvement. Medical management included intensive topical steroid therapy, oral steroid therapy and immunosuppressant agents. Surgical therapy included tissue adhesive and bandage contact lens application, amniotic membrane transplantation, optical penetrating keratoplasty and limbal stem cell transplantation and was performed in most eyes as part of primary management or later during the disease course. Patients were followed up for a mean of 69.1 weeks. Ten eyes healed successfully and one developed descemetocele. Three eyes developed secondary infections, one of which ultimately became phthisical. In most eyes, final vision either remained stable or was better than at presentation.

Conclusions Our data suggest demographic and clinical features of Mooren's ulcer in children differ from those in adults. Good anatomical results and stable visual results can be achieved with appropriate medical and surgical therapies. Systemic steroids and immunosuppression should be used judiciously with close monitoring.

Footnotes

  • Funding This study was funded by the Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation, India.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval Ethics approval was provided by the Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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