eLetters

558 e-Letters

  • Ophthalmologists wake obstructive sleeping dogma

    We read with great interest the article by Keenan et al. “Associations between obstructive sleep apnoea, primary open angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration: record linkage study” (Br J Ophthalmol. 2017 Feb;101(2):155-159), which concluded that Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is not associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG). Potential POAG aetiology inflammatory markers are higher in OSA patients, and glaucoma diagnosis is more common in OSA populations.

    While retrospective studies have great value, it is important to account for risk-associated conditions, including family history of OSA, racial disparities [1], smoking, hypertension, floppy eyelids, Type II diabetes [2], COPD and obesity.

    To determine a causal relationship between OSA and POAG, it is necessary to assess intraocular pressures/visual field progression before and after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, using prospective randomised control trial designs. Further, the OSA base rate in Keenan et al. was 2.5%, while the estimated OSA prevalence rate may exceed 20% for those over 55 years of age [3]. Missing 90+% of apnoea sufferers may have blurred the true apnoea-POAG relationship. The risk rate for apnoea in the first year after initial POAG episode was 1.5, but declined to less than 1.0 in subsequent years, which suggests the possibility of increasing neglect of apnoea risk over the course of POAG. These findings highlight the lack of OSA screening and...

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  • Short-term efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept depending on angiographic classification of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy

    Short-term efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept depending on angiographic classification of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy
    Dan Calugaru, Mihai Calugaru
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Medicine Cluj-Napoca/Romania

    Re: Short-term efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept depending on angiographic classification of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Jeong and Sagong. Br J Ophthalmol 2016; http: /dx.doi. org/ 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2016-309144.

    Dear Editor
    We would like to address several challenges that have arisen from the study by Jeong and Sagong (1), which can be specifically summarized below.
    1. The study included a relatively small sample size of cases examined with a fairly short follow-up period.
    2. Several relevant data are missing in the study. For example, the anatomic types of macular edema (diffuse/cystic changes within neurosensory retina/subretinal/sub retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fluid/ mixed type) at baseline and at months 3 and 6; the qualitative status of the 4 outer retinal layers (eg, the external limiting membrane band, the ellipsoid zone, the interdigitation zone, and the retinal pigment epithelial band) at presentation as well as the magnitude of changes (disruption/absence) during the study as potential predictors of visual loss/improvement after aflibercept (Eylea; Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., Tarrytown, New York, USA) treatment; the percentages of patients with complete polyp regression and...

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  • How should we call POEMS syndrome associated optic neuropathy?

    We have read with great interest Yokouchi et al’s article on the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and peripapillary retinal thickness in patients with POEMS syndrome(1) and we would like to share some reflections onthis mysterious form of optic neuropathy.
    The acronym that gives name to the disorder does not include any ocular manifestation. However these patients frequently do develop ocular manifestations. Bilateral optic disc involvement appears in half of the patients and it has been considered an independent prognostic factor.(2)POEMS syndrome associated optic disc swelling constitutes a form of optic neuropathy that is not easy to classify. It is usually bilateral, but intracranial pressure is not elevated in most patients, so the term papilledema (although commonly used) is probably inaccurate. Most authors believe this optic neuropathy is related to increased VEGF levels, and Yokouchi et al’s work seems to support this theory.(1) From a pathogenic point of view optic disc swelling induced by cytokines should probably be considered a form of optic neuritis. However, inflammatory neuropathies often associate pain with eye movements and usually produce visual loss (reduced visual acuity and visual field damage) while POEMS patients present only minor visual disturbance and the visual prognosis is good.(3)
    We suggest that POEMS associated optic disc swelling should be considered a new form of optic neuropathy. This neuro...

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  • Response to "Preoperative aqueous humour flare values do not predict proliferative vitreoretinopathy in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment"

    We noticed the article entitled "Preoperative aqueous humour flare values do not predict proliferative vitreoretinopathy in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment" by Mulder and associates with interest.(1)

    Several studies have been published concluding that elevated aqueous flare values seem to be associated with increased risk for PVR redetachment.(2-4) Schroeder et al reported that values >15 photon counts per milliseconds (pc/ms) increases the risk for PVR 16-fold.(4) Hoerster et al showed that the odds ratio for PVR development with preoperative flare values >15pc/ms was 30.7 (p=0.0001) with a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 79%.(3) Conart et al verified these findings (OR 12.3, p<0.0001 for later PVR in flare values >15 pc/ms).(2)

    In contrast Mulder et al concluded on their data compilation that laser flare measurements are inaccurate in predicting PVR.(1) Logistic regression analyses showed a significant increase in odds with increasing flare at least for the second centre (1) supporting the notion that high flare measurements herald PVR. However, the large variation precluded sufficient sensitivity and specificity to separate between groups. We assume the reason for the large variation is that high-level outliers were included. For center 2 only the highest and the lowest values were excluded, no information is provided for center 1. Values of 100pc/ms, here up to 312pc/ms, are uncommon for the low-level type of i...

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  • Morphological and functional changes in recalcitrant diabetic macular oedema after intravitreal dexamethasone implant
    Mihai Calugaru

    Morphological and functional changes in recalcitrant diabetic macular oedema after intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Dan Calugaru, Mihai Calugaru Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Medicine Cluj-Napoca/Romania

    Re: Morphological and functional changes in recalcitrant diabetic macular oedema after intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Iacono et al. Br J Ophthalmol 2016;http:/dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-201...

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  • Re:re: Trends and complications of local anaesthesia in cataract surgery: an 8-year analysis of 12 992 patients
    Thanigasalam Thevi
    Response to: Role of Case Series Studies in the Identification of Anaesthetic Complications Dear Editor, We would like to acknowledge Eke and Kumar for their comments on our article.1 In our retrospective case series study of 12,992 patients, we noted that subtenon anaesthesia had more complications and that both topical and subtenon anaesthesia in our series were the ideal anaesthetics.

    Retrospective case series studies s...

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  • re: Trends and complications of local anaesthesia in cataract surgery: an 8-year analysis of 12 992 patients
    Tom Eke

    Editor,

    We read Thevi and Godhino's article (1) with interest, but we feel that the methodology does not support their conclusions. They aimed to 'find out the most suitable anaesthesia for patients with fewer complications' in cataract surgery, and reported that 'sub-Tenon anaesthesia [STA] was associated with more intraoperative and postoperative complications ... topical anaesthesia [TA] ... is the ideal a...

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  • Comments on: Five-year results of Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (ReLEx SMILE)
    ESHA AGARWAL

    We read with great interest article entitled "Five-year results of Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (ReLEx SMILE)" by Blum et al (1). They concluded SMILE to be an effective, stable and safe procedure for treatment of myopia and myopic astigmatism in the long term. However, few queries come to our mind.

    In their study they observed regression of 0.48 D over a period of five years, which they attributed mainly...

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  • Re: Response to AREDS supplements according to genetic factors: survival analysis approach using the eye as the unit of analysis
    Carl C. Awh

    We read with interest the article by Seddon, Silver, and Rosner1, in which the authors studied progression from intermediate AMD to either geographic atrophy or choroidal neovascularization as a function of genetic risk and AREDS treatment assignment. This study of 4124 eyes by leaders in AMD genetic epidemiology is by far the largest series to analyze and validate a gene/treatment interaction. The authors show that CFH an...

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  • Re:Response to: Computer-aided design and three-dimensional printing in the manufacturing of an ocular prosthesis
    Ilse Mombaerts

    Response to e-letter to the editor

    We thank Dr. Mourits and co-workers for their interest and comments regarding our manuscript on impression-free three-dimensional (3D) printed anophthalmic socket, and appreciate their recognition of its value in the manufacturing of an ocular prosthesis.(1)

    Dr. Mourits and co-workers propose an alternative technique, impression mould through silicon injection in the a...

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