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Effect of a formulated eye drop with Leptospermum spp honey on tear film properties
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  • Published on:
    Honey eye drops, the effect of sugars
    • Alireza Peyman, Associate Professor, Isfahan Eye Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran Isfahan Eye Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

    I read the interesting manuscript entitled “Effect of a formulated eye drop with Leptospermum spp honey on tear film properties”. Authors have compared a formulated eye drop made of honey and regular lubricant drops finding some advantages of the honey eye drop. While the natural honey mainly composed of sugars, the beneficial effect might merely related to these simple carbohydrates. If authors have decided to find any effect, peculiarly attributed to the honey, they might design a control group with similar composition of simple carbohydrates to disclose the unclouded actual effect of the honey. On the other side, there might be some possible complications of promoting such agents as proved treatments, that have been already in use as alternative home made remedies; we have reported a case of Acanthamoeba keratitis using non-sterile honey eye drop (1).

    1. Peyman A, Pourazizi M, Peyman M, Kianersi F. Natural Honey-Induced Acanthamoeba keratitis. Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol. 2020 Jan 29;26(4):243-245. doi: 10.4103/meajo.MEAJO_56_18. PMID: 32153338; PMCID: PMC7034153.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.