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OCTA characterisation of microvascular retinal alterations in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy
  1. Marco Battista1,
  2. Enrico Borrelli1,
  3. Mariacristina Parravano2,
  4. Francesco Gelormini1,
  5. Massimiliano Tedeschi2,
  6. Daniele De Geronimo2,
  7. Riccardo Sacconi1,
  8. Lea Querques1,
  9. Francesco Bandello1,
  10. Giuseppe Querques1
  1. 1 Department of Ophthalmology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, University Vita-Salute, Milano, Italy
  2. 2 Ophthalmology, Fondazione G.B.Bietti-IRCCS, Rome, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Professor Giuseppe Querques, Ophthalmology, Ospedale San Raffaele, 20132 Milano, Italy; giuseppe.querques{at}hotmail.it

Abstract

Purpose This study aimed to describe the characteristics of microvascular retinal alterations in eyes with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) employing optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) analysis.

Methods We collected data from 472 eyes with chronic CSC from 336 patients who had OCTA obtained. Each OCTA image was graded by two readers to assess the presence of microvascular retinal alterations, including regions of vascular rarefaction/retinal hypoperfusion, enlargement of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) and presence of telangiectasias or microaneurysms. Volume spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were obtained through the macula and the OCT was correlated with the OCTA findings in eyes with retinal vascular alterations.

Results OCTA displayed microvascular retinal alterations in 18 out of 474 eyes (3.6%) from 14 patients (13 male and 1 female; mean±SD age was 54.7±11.1 years). One eye displayed the presence of retinal telangiectasias, while 17 out of 18 eyes were graded as having areas of retinal vascular rarefactions, and 3 out of 17 eyes were also characterised by an enlargement of the FAZ. The parafoveal region was the location most involved by retinal vascular changes (66,7%), followed by foveal (22,2%) and perifoveal (11.1%) regions, respectively.

Conclusion Although CSC is known to represent a choroidal disorder, retinal vascular alterations may be present in these eyes and OCTA may represent a useful tool to identify and describe them.

  • retina
  • imaging
  • macula

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Footnotes

  • MB and EB contributed equally.

  • Contributors GQ, EB and MB gave substantial contributions to conception and design of the work. MB, FG, MP, MT and DDG gave substantial contributions to the acquisition of data and images. EB, MB and RS gave substantial contributions to the analysis and interpretation of data for the work. GQ, MB and EB gave substantial contributions to drafting the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content. GQ, LQ and FB gave substantial contributions for the final approval of the version to be published.

  • Funding The research for this paper was in part financially supported by Italian Ministry of Health and Fondazione Roma. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

  • Competing interests FB is a consultant for Alcon (Fort Worth, Texas, USA), Alimera Sciences (Alpharetta, Georgia, USA), Allergan (Irvine, California, USA), Farmila-Thea (Clermont-Ferrand, France), Bayer Shering-Pharma (Berlin, Germany), Bausch And Lomb (Rochester, New York, USA), Genentech (San Francisco, California, USA), Hoffmann-La-Roche (Basel, Switzerland), NovagaliPharma (Évry, France), Novartis (Basel, Switzerland), Sanofi-Aventis (Paris, France), Thrombogenics (Heverlee, Belgium), Zeiss (Dublin, USA), outside the submitted work. GQ is a consultant for Alimera Sciences (Alpharetta, Georgia, USA), Allergan (Irvine, California, USA), Heidelberg (Germany), Novartis (Basel, Switzerland), Bayer Shering-Pharma (Berlin, Germany), Zeiss (Dublin, USA), outside the submitted work. MP reports personal fees from Allergan, personal fees from Bayer, personal fees from Novartis, outside the submitted work. Other authors: none. Other acknowledgements: The research for this paper was in part financially supported by the Italian Ministry of Health and Fondazione Roma. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval The study adhered to the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study and it was approved by the local Institutional Review Board (IRB).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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