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Repeatability of automated leakage quantification and microaneurysm identification utilising an analysis platform for ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography
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    Repeatability of automated leakage quantification and microaneurysm identification ‎utilising an analysis platform for ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography. Avoid ‎misinterpretation
    • Siamak Sabour, Clinical Epidemiologist Department of Clinical Epidemiology, School of Health and Safety, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical ‎Sciences, Tehran, I.R.
    • Other Contributors:
      • Fariba Ghassemi, Retina and Vitreous Surgeon - Ocular Oncologist

    Synopsis:‎
    Applying Pearson r to assesses the repeatability of a test is a methodologic mistake which leads to ‎misinterpretation.‎

    Repeatability of automated leakage quantification and microaneurysm identification ‎utilising an analysis platform for ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography. Avoid ‎misinterpretation
    Dear editor, We were interested to read the paper by Jiang A et al. published in Apr 2020 edition of the ‎Br J Ophthalmol.1 Ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography (UWFA) provides unique opportunities for ‎panretinal assessment of retinal diseases. The objective quantification of UWFA features is a labour-intensive ‎manual process, limiting its utility. The authors aimed to assesses the consistency/repeatability of an automated ‎assessment platform for the characterization of retinal vascular features, quantification of microaneurysms (MA) ‎and leakage foci in UWFA images. For each eye, two arteriovenous-phase images and two late-phase images ‎were selected. Automated assessment was performed for retinal vascular features, MA identification and ‎leakage segmentation. Panretinal and zonal assessment of metrics was performed. The authors mentioned a ‎significant correlation between paired time points for retinal vessel area and vessel length on early images ‎‎(Pearson r=0.92, p<0.0001; Pearson r=0.94, p<0.0001) and late images (Pearson r=0.92, p<0.0001; Pearson ‎r=0.92, p<0.0001, respectively). Panretinal and zonal MA counts demonst...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.