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Endoresection of choroidal melanoma
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  1. Bertil Damatoa,
  2. Carl Groenewaldb,
  3. Jim McGalliardb,
  4. David Wongb
  1. aOcular Oncology Service, St Paul’s Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, bVitreo-Retinal Service, St Paul’s Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool
  1. Mr Bertil Damato, Ocular Oncology Service, St Paul’s Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool L7 8XP.

Abstract

AIMS The results of 52 endoresections for choroidal melanoma are reported.

METHODS The current technique involves vitrectomy, retinal incision over or peripheral to the tumour, haemostasis by raising intraocular pressure and by moderate hypotensive anaesthesia, choroidal incision around tumour, endoresection with vitrector, endodiathermy to bleeding points and residual tumour, fluid-air exchange to reattach retina, endolaser to achieve retinal adhesion around the coloboma and destroy residual tumour in the sclera, silicone oil injection with removal after 12 weeks, cryotherapy to the sclerotomies, and adjunctive ruthenium plaque radiotherapy in selected cases.

RESULTS Patients receiving primary endoresection had a mean age of 53 years, a mean largest basal tumour diameter of 8.2 mm, and a mean tumour thickness of 3.9 mm. 40 tumours extended to within 2 disc diameters of the optic disc, with 17 involving disc. Follow up ranged from 40 days to 7 years (median 20 months). At the last visit, 90% of eyes were retained, with vision of 6/6–6/12 (two), 6/18–6/36 (three), 6/60 to counting fingers (18), hand movements (nine), and light perception (four). The main complications were retinal detachment in 16 and cataract in 25. Secondary endoresection (11) was performed after plaque radiotherapy (four), photocoagulation (four), trans-scleral local resection (two), and proton beam radiotherapy (one), with retention of the eye in nine cases. By the close of the study, no patients developed definite local tumour recurrence but one died of metastatic disease 41 months postoperatively.

CONCLUSION Depending on tumour location, endoresection may conserve central vision or temporal field when radiotherapy would be expected to cause optic neuropathy. Longer follow up is necessary to establish the efficacy of tumour control.

  • uveal melanoma
  • choroidal melanoma
  • ocular neoplasms
  • vitrectomy
  • endoresection
  • photocoagulation
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