Article Text

Mechanical ptosis and lagophthalmos in cutaneous leishmaniasis
  1. AHMET SATICI,
  2. BULENT GURLER
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  2. Department of Dermatology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  3. Department of Microbiology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  4. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  1. MEHMET S GUREL
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  2. Department of Dermatology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  3. Department of Microbiology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  4. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  1. GONUL ASLAN
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  2. Department of Dermatology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  3. Department of Microbiology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  4. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  1. HALIT OGUZ
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  2. Department of Dermatology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  3. Department of Microbiology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  4. Department of Ophthalmology, Harran University, School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey
  1. Dr A Satici.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Editor,—Leishmaniasis is caused by infection of the protozoan Leishmania and is clinically classified as Old and New World cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, or visceral leishmaniasis. In the Old World, CL exists in the Middle East, Mediterranean regions, southern Asia, and northern and central parts of Africa.1 CL has been continuing endemically for ages in Sanliurfa, a city in south eastern Turkey.2

CL usually affects unclothed parts of the body, such as the face, legs and arms, that can easily be bitten by a female sandfly vector.3 Also, CL may rarely appear in the eyelid. CL generally begins as a red-brown papule or nodule at the site of inoculation.4 The initial nodular erythematous lesion usually breaks down to form an ulcer. About 90% of such lesions heal spontaneously in months, usually leaving a scar.5

A case of cutaneous leishmaniasis of ocular involvement resulting in mechanical ptosis and …

View Full Text

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.