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Promoter mutations of myocilin gene in Japanese patients with open angle glaucoma including normal tension glaucoma
  1. RYO SUZUKI
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service
  2. Yamaguchi University School of Medicine
  3. 755-8505, Japan
  4. Yamaguchi University School of Health Sciences
  1. YUKIO HATTORI,
  2. KOZUE OKANO
  1. Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service
  2. Yamaguchi University School of Medicine
  3. 755-8505, Japan
  4. Yamaguchi University School of Health Sciences
  1. Dr Ryo Suzuki suzuki{at}po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

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Editor,—Mutations causing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) have been identified in the chromosome 1 open angle glaucoma gene (GLCL1A), which encodes a 57 kD protein known as myocilin (MYOC).1-4 A number of mutations of the MYOC gene that are associated with glaucoma have been reported in different ethnic groups.1-3 The mutations occur in 2–4% of POAG patients, but mostly in the exons. Although five different such alleles have been identified among Japanese patients,5 6 they are rare and a promoter region has not received much attention. We conducted a study using the same methods1 2 in Japanese patients with POAG and normal tension glaucoma (NTG) who had a family history of the …

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