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The disappearing “melanoma”
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  1. DAN S GOMBOS
  1. MELISSA L MELDRUM
  1. JENNIFER HASENYAGER SMITH
  1. CHEN LEE
  1. JOAN M O'BRIEN
  1. Ocular Oncology Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
  2. California, USA
  3. Department of Ophthalmology, The Emory Clinic, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  4. Ocular Oncology Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
  5. California, USA
  6. Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of California
  7. San Francisco, California, USA
  8. Ocular Oncology Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
  9. California, USA
  1. Joan O'Brien, MD, Director, Ocular Oncology Unit, University of California, San Francisco, 10 Kirkham Street, Box 0730, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA

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Editor,—Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Accurate diagnosis relies upon evaluation by indirect ophthalmoscopy as well as on characteristic features present on ancillary tests such as ultrasonography and angiography. Masquerading lesions can occasionally provide diagnostic challenges. Common simulating lesions include choroidal naevi, metastases, haemangioma, osteoma, CHRPE, and disciform scar.1 We report the case of a patient with a lesion simulating an intraocular melanoma which resulted from the development of an orbital cyst that indented the globe.

CASE REPORT

A 49 year old white male was referred with a diagnosis of an intraocular melanoma. He complained of progressively decreasing vision in his right eye over the previous 1.5 years. His medical history was …

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