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Suprachoroidal haemorrhage complicating cataract surgery in the UK: epidemiology, clinical features, management, and outcomes
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  1. R Ling1,
  2. M Cole1,
  3. C James1,
  4. S Kamalarajah2,
  5. B Foot3,
  6. S Shaw4
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, Torbay Hospital, Torquay, UK
  2. 2Eye and Ear Clinic, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK
  3. 3The British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit, The Royal College of Ophthalmologists, UK
  4. 4Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Plymouth, UK
  1. Correspondence to: MrR Ling Consultant Ophthalmologist, West of England Eye Unit, Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital (Wonford), Barrack Road, Exeter EX2 5DW, UK; roland.lingrdehc-tr.swest.nhs.uk

Abstract

Aims: To study the incidence, management, and outcomes of suprachoroidal haemorrhage (SCH) complicating cataract surgery in the United Kingdom.

Methods: Cases were prospectively collected by active surveillance through the British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit. Details were obtained using an incident questionnaire with follow up at 6 months.

Results: 118 cases were reported in 1 year. The estimated incidence of SCH was 0.04% (95% confidence interval 0.034% to 0.050%). Cataract extractions were by phacoemulsification in 76.2%, extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) in 11.0%, and phacoemulsification conversion in 12.8%. SCH was “limited” (1 to 2 quadrants) in 48.7%, “full blown” (3 to 4 quadrants) in 43.1%. SCH in phacoemulsification was more likely to be limited (63.2%), compared with ECCE (11.1%) and phacoemulsification conversion (23.1%) (p<0.001, χ2 test). Visual acuity (VA) was better than 6/60 in 57 of 95 (60%) cases after a median follow up interval of 185 days. 33 of 34 cases (97.1%) with secondary anterior segment revision had VA better than 6/60. VA was worse than 6/60 in 7 of 8 (87.5%) cases that had intraoperative sclerostomy, and in all 6 (100%) cases that had secondary posterior segment intervention.

Conclusion: SCH is a rare but serious complication of cataract surgery. Poor prognostic factors included full blown SCH, ECCE, phacoemulsification conversion, retinal apposition, and retinal detachment.

  • suprachoroidal haemorrhage
  • cataract surgery
  • epidemiology
  • outcomes
  • BOSU, British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit
  • ECCE, extracapsular technique
  • SCH, suprachoroidal haemorrhage
  • VA, visual acuity
  • suprachoroidal haemorrhage
  • cataract surgery
  • epidemiology
  • outcomes
  • BOSU, British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit
  • ECCE, extracapsular technique
  • SCH, suprachoroidal haemorrhage
  • VA, visual acuity

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