Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Effect of mydriasis and different field strategies on digital image screening of diabetic eye disease
  1. H Murgatroyd1,
  2. A Ellingford1,
  3. A Cox1,
  4. M Binnie1,
  5. J D Ellis1,
  6. C J MacEwen1,
  7. G P Leese2
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK
  2. 2Department of Diabetes, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK
  1. Correspondence to: Dr G Leese Wards 1& 2, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK; graham.leesetuht.scot.nhs.uk

Abstract

Aims: To assess the effects of (1) mydriasis and (2) single versus three field photography on screening for diabetic eye disease using digital photography

Method: Slit lamp examination findings were compared to digital fundal photographs for the detection of any retinopathy and for referable retinopathy in 398 patients (794 eyes). A Topcon TRC-NW6S digital non-mydriatic fundus camera was used. Three photographic strategies were used: undilated single field, dilated single field, and dilated multiple fields. The photographs were presented in random order to one of two retinal screeners. For the single field photographs the screeners were masked to the use of mydriatics. In 13% of fundal photographs, grading was performed by both, rather than just one grader.

Results: Mydriasis reduced the proportion of ungradable photographs from 26% to 5% (p<0.001). Neither mydriasis nor three field photography improved the sensitivity or specificity for the detection of any retinopathy or of referable retinopathy when compared with undilated single field photography. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting referable retinopathy using undilated single field photography was 77% (95% CI 71 to 84) and 95 % (95% CI 93 to 97) respectively. Using dilated single field photography the figures were 81% (95% CI 76 to 87) and 92% (95% CI 90 to 94) respectively. Using dilated three field photography the figures were 83% (95% CI 78 to 88) and 93% (95% CI 91 to 96) respectively. Intergrader reliability for the detection of referable retinopathy in gradable photographs was excellent (Kappa values 0.86–1.00).

Conclusions: Mydriasis reduces the technical failure rate. Mydriasis and the three field photography as used in this study do not increase the sensitivity or specificity of detecting diabetic retinopathy.

  • CI, confidence interval
  • DD, disc diameter
  • diabetic retinopathy
  • mydriasis
  • mass screening
  • tropicamide
  • CI, confidence interval
  • DD, disc diameter
  • diabetic retinopathy
  • mydriasis
  • mass screening
  • tropicamide
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding: Ross Foundation, Tenovus Scotland and TUHT grant scheme.

  • Proprietary interests: none.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.