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Risk factors for disease progression in low-teens normal-tension glaucoma
  1. Sung Uk Baek1,2,
  2. Ahnul Ha3,4,
  3. Dai Woo Kim5,6,
  4. Jin Wook Jeoung3,4,
  5. Ki Ho Park3,4,
  6. Young Kook Kim3,4
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  4. 4Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University hospital, Seoul, Korea
  5. 5Department of Ophthalmology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea
  6. 6Department of Ophthalmology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea
  1. Correspondence to Young Kook Kim, Ophthalmology, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu 110-744, Republic of Korea; md092{at}naver.com

Abstract

Background/Aims To investigate the risk factors for disease progression of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) with pretreatment intraocular pressure (IOP) in the low-teens.

Methods One-hundred and two (102) eyes of 102 patients with NTG with pretreatment IOP≤12 mm Hg who had been followed up for more than 60 months were retrospectively enrolled. Patients were divided into progressor and non-progressor groups according to visual field (VF) progression as correlated with change of optic disc or retinal nerve fibre layer defect. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics including diurnal IOP and 24 hours blood pressure (BP) were compared between the two groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify the risk factors for disease progression.

Results Thirty-six patients (35.3%) were classified as progressors and 66 (64.7%) as non-progressors. Between the two groups, no significant differences were found in the follow-up periods (8.7±3.4 vs 7.7±3.2 years; p=0.138), baseline VF mean deviation (−4.50±5.65 vs −3.56±4.30 dB; p=0.348) or pretreatment IOP (11.34±1.21 vs 11.17±1.06 mm Hg; p=0.121). The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model indicated that greater diurnal IOP at baseline (HR=1.609; p=0.004), greater fluctuation of diastolic BP (DBP; HR=1.058; p=0.002) and presence of optic disc haemorrhage during follow-up (DH; HR=3.664; p=0.001) were risk factors for glaucoma progression.

Conclusion In the low-teens NTG eyes, 35.3% showed glaucoma progression during the average 8.7 years of follow-up. Fluctuation of DBP and diurnal IOP as well as DH were significantly associated with greater probability of disease progression.

  • low-teens
  • normal-tension glaucoma
  • glaucoma progression
  • risk factors
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Footnotes

  • Contributors SUB: study design, writing the article, data collection, analysis and interpretation of the data, literature search, critical revision of the article. AH: data collection, analysis and interpretation of the data, literature search, critical revision of the article. DWK: analysis and interpretation of the data, literature search. JWJ: study design, data collection. KHP: study design, data collection, critical revision of the article. YKK: study design, writing the article, data collection, analysis and interpretation of the data, literature search, critical revision of the article, final approval of the article.

  • Funding This work was supported by a National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korean government (MSIP; Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning) (No. 880-20180281).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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