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Influence of corneal guttae and nuclear cataract on contrast sensitivity
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  • Published on:
    Subclinical Corneal Edema and Contrast Sensitivity in Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy
    • Sanjay V Patel, Cornea Surgeon & Professor of Ophthalmology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

    Eyes with Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) are known to have reduced contrast vision from increased glare even if high-contrast acuity is not affected.1 In a retrospective study, Augustin and colleagues suggested that corneal guttae without edema contribute to decreased contrast sensitivity, and that such eyes would benefit from Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK).2 The topic is important because it is unknown whether guttae in the absence of any corneal edema affect vision and therefore whether such eyes truly benefit from DMEK. The authors enrolled eyes with >5 mm of confluent guttae and without edema (modified Krachmer grade 5); however, they did not state their definition of “edema”. In FECD, when corneal edema is not clinically detectable by slit-lamp examination, it can be detected by Scheimpflug tomography.3 A recent study found evidence of subclinical corneal edema in 88% of eyes with FECD grade 5 and almost 40% of eyes with lesser grades of FECD.4 It is therefore highly likely that many of the FECD eyes examined by Augustin and colleagues did in fact have subclinical corneal edema, so can the authors examine the Scheimpflug tomograms of these eyes and report the contrast sensitivity results based on the presence or absence of subclinical edema? This is important because reduced contrast sensitivity might be caused by subclinical edema and not simply by “guttae without edema”, and cornea surgeons should not conclude that it is appr...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.