Responses

Download PDFPDF
Incidence of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in France from 2010 to 2016: seasonal and geographical variations
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • carlos Sevillano Torrado, Eloy Viso
    Published on:
  • Published on:
    Dr
    • carlos Sevillano Torrado, Ophthalmologist Hospital Complex of Pontevedra
    • Other Contributors:
      • Eloy Viso, Ophthalmology Chief

    In your interesting paper dealing with the incidence of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in France, you report the highest incidence rate so far together with Gout et al 1. It is almost twice as high as the incidence found in our area 2. You also report that this incidence was highest in Guadeloupe (28.30±2.74 per 100000 population) and lowest in French Guiana (15.51±3.50 per 100000 population).

    Peters 3 investigated the incidence of RRD in black people and found that it was much lower (0.46/100,000 inhabitants) than in whites. Foos et al. 4 also found that there were no differences in the number of breaks or the proportion/ percentage of vitreous detachments between black and white people, suggesting a stronger adherence in their retinal pigmentary epithelium in the former. Given the fact that black subjects present higher levels of melanin, they have greater resistance against solar radiation, in the same way that they present a lower incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer due to this protective factor 5. Similarly, there is a lower risk of RRD in very dark-colored iris 6 subjects, possibly due to the same reason, as a smaller amount of solar radiation, which has been found to be associated with RRD 7 enters the eye. Taking into account that 70-90% of the population in the French Antilles are mulattoes or creoles (source: indexmundi.com), the lower incidence detected in this geographical location is not surprising. However, we encourage the authors to investigate...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.