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Hypotony in uveitis: an overview of medical and surgical management
  1. Ilaria Testi1,2,
  2. Antonio Calcagni3,
  3. Keith Barton4,
  4. James Gooch1,
  5. Harry Petrushkin1,2
  1. 1Uveitis and Scleritis Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Rheumatology Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK, London, UK
  3. 3Department of Electrophysiology, Moorfields Eye Hospital, National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, London, UK
  4. 4UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ilaria Testi, Department of Uveitis, Moorfields Eye Hospital, National Health Service Foundation Trust, London EC1V 2PD, UK; ilaria.testi{at}nhs.net

Abstract

Hypotony is a well-recognised, sight-threatening complication of uveitis. It can also be the final common endpoint for a multitude of disease entities. Multiple mechanisms underlie hypotony, and meticulous clinical history alongside ocular phenotyping is necessary for choosing the best intervention and therapeutic management. In this narrative review, a comprehensive overview of medical and surgical treatment options for the management of non-surgically induced hypotony is provided. Management of ocular hypotony relies on the knowledge of the aetiology and mechanisms involved. An understanding of disease trajectory is vital to properly educate patients. Both anatomical and functional outcomes depend on the underlying pathophysiology and choice of treatment.

  • Ciliary body
  • Inflammation
  • Intraocular pressure

Data availability statement

Data sharing not applicable as no datasets generated and/or analysed for this study.

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Data availability statement

Data sharing not applicable as no datasets generated and/or analysed for this study.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors IT—conceptualisation, writing (original draft). HP—conceptualisation, supervision, writing (review and editing). KB—writing (review and editing). JG—resources. AC—electrophysiology review and editing.

  • Funding This work was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre based at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology.

  • Disclaimer The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

  • Competing interests The authors have no relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organisation or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript. This includes employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, or royalties.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.