eLetters

180 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • Author's Reply
    Simon DM Chen

    Dear Editor

    We thank BV Kumar and S Prasad for their interest in our report describing the successful treatment of macular oedema (MO) secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) with intravitreal triamcinolone injection (IVTI).[1]

    Although definitively establishing a clinical diagnosis of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) may be problematic, our patient did not have a Weiss ring and no eviden...

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  • Ophthalmia neonatorum prophylaxis: Authors' reply
    Sherwin J. Isenberg

    Dear Editor

    We greatly appreciate the inquiry of Dr Vendantham and are happy to reply to his questions.[1]

    While Dr Vendantham is correct regarding the definition of ophthalmia neonatorum including all infections acquired by an infant during the first 30 days of life, for the purposes of our study,[2] we were primarily interested in those cases resulting from neonatal exposure in the birth canal. This...

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  • Potential complications of phakic IOLs
    Haralabos Eleftheriadis

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the case report of Ashraff et al[1] where a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (PCPIOL) was used in a pseudophakic eye with axial myopia and pseudoexfoliation for the management of anisometropia. I would like to highlight a potential problem in such eyes: dislocation of PCPIOL into the vitreous cavity.

    PCPIOLs are inserted blindly behind the iris and, depen...

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  • How does intravitreal triamcinolone work?
    Somdutt Prasad

    Dear Editor

    SDM Chen and colleagues present a case of successful treatment of macular oedema in the setting of ischaemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO).[1]

    Intravitreal triamcinolone is increasingly being used as part of our therapeutic armaterium in a wide range of conditions. However it’s mode of action is still to be fully elucidated. It is known that the induction of a posterior vitreous detachme...

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  • Reply to the author: Charles Bonnet Syndrome
    Imran Rahman

    Dear Editor

    I thank Dr Tomsak for his reply[1] to my comments.[2]

    In response to point one,we agree that historically CBS is a disorder described in the elderly, but as we mentioned in our previous reply, this can easily be explained by the higher incidence of visual loss in the elderly. Further, without formal child pyschiatry review it is difficult to give a incidence in the childhood of CBS. As you wo...

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  • Author's reply
    Martin A. Mainster

    Dear Editor

    I appreciate Dr Van Gelder’s thoughtful comments regarding the potential consequences of a UV+blue light absorbing intraocular lens (IOL) on circadian rhythmicity.[1] I agree that the clinical importance of retinal ganglion photoreceptors is currently unknown and that decreasing the amount of blue light reaching them might affect their function. Conversely, if photosensitive ganglia respond to circadia...

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  • Blue light and the circadian clock
    Russell N. Van Gelder

    Dear Editor

    Drs Mainster and Sparrow have provided an excellent perspective on the relative merits and difficulties of extending IOL absorption into the blue portion of the spectrum.[1]

    However, they have not considered an unintentional consequence of blockage of the blue portion of the spectrum: reducing the activity of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.[2, 3] These cells subserve se...

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  • LASIK in children?
    Philip Lempert, MD

    Dear Editor

    The authors report on LASIK surgery in five children with unilateral high myopia who were presumed to have amblyopia. One subject had bilateral high myopia.

    Optic nerve hypoplasia is associated with high myopia. In addition, anisometropic myopia is a common sequela of retinopathy of prematurity. Thinning of the sclera with posterior staphyloma formation has long been known to be associa...

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  • Could there be another mechanism?
    Harvey A. Birsner

    Dear Editor

    I am the surgeon who found the case in the Skarf article in 1983. The patient was comatose with an acute subdural hematoma and we only found it with the help of visual evoked responses. Our case had ipsilateral blindness. We did not have MRI and our patient died. The very late onset of contralateral blindness in your case gives me pause as to the actual etiology of visual loss. One might incriminate a "do...

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  • Treatment for presumed Ocular tuberculosis
    Salil A Mehta

    Dear Editor

    I was delighted to read Dr Okada’s reply to my letter.[1] At the risk of transgressing from the point of the original article [2] that dealt with a novel technique to administer triamcinolone to a wide group of patients with uveitis, I would like to reply:

    1. The WHO guidelines are indeed silent on the treatment of latent tuberculosis which can be defined as merely positive mantoux tests w...

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