eLetters

89 e-Letters

published between 2007 and 2010

  • Awareness on eye tumours and Down syndrome
    Francis L Munier

    Dear Editor

    A metastizing adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium in a 37-year-old man with Down syndrome (DS) has recently been reported in the British Journal of Ophthalmology [1]. In the article the authors underlined an unusual and atypical aggressive behaviour of the tumour which was the first well documented adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium with metastases. Although solid tumours are...

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  • Author's response
    Ferdinando Bottoni

    Dear Editor

    We thank Dr Ayata for the thoughtful comments of our article. He had three questions that we would like to answer as follows:
    1) Figure 1 was quite important for the paper because it shows the exact location of the macular pigment in monkeys (courtesy of Francois Delori, PhD). We are sorry for the lack of the image in the on-line paper version but it was probably due to the PDF saving...

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  • Methylation in uveal melanoma
    Pieter A van der Velden

    Dear editor,

    Epigenetic regulation of tumor suppressor genes provides an attractive mechanism for tumors in which mutations and structural changes are rare. The latter may apply to uveal melanoma for which little is known of the genes that contribute to tumor development. In the search for genes, uveal melanoma is often compared to its counterpart in the skin, cutaneous melanoma. One of the major cuteneous melan...

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  • Re: Intraocular pressure rise during dilatation -author's reply
    George L Spaeth

    Dear Dr Radcliffe and colleagues,

    Thank you for your comments. Two cases with the exfoliation syndrome and one with pigmentary glaucoma were included in our study. As you mentioned, dilatation of the pupil often causes a rise of intraocular pressure in such cases. However, none of the three individuals in our study had a significant rise of intraocular pressure or progression of glaucoma. Sincerely, George Sp...

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  • Re: Newcastle score in intermittent exotropia -authors reply
    Michael P Clarke

    Dear Editor

    We thank Dr Kesarwani for the interest in our article.

    In response to the points raised:

    1. Inclusion criteria
    We attempted to recruit children with X(T) measuring more than 20 prism dioptres when fixing a 6 metre target, as angles under this amount are usually felt not to require treatment. However, Dr Kesarwani is correct to point out that, at the baseline assessme...

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  • Quantitative Analyses of Fundus Autofluorescence
    Ali Ayata

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the recently published article by Bottoni and associates. However, we would like to express our concerns regarding their article entitled “Diagnosis of macular pseudoholes and lamellar macular holes: is optical coherence tomography the gold standard?” Br. J. Ophthalmol. published online 1 Feb 2008; doi:10.1136/bjo.2007.127597. [1] In this article, the authors investigate...

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  • Re: Amblyopia and visual function
    Huibert J Simonsz

    Dear Editor,

    I appreciate the letter by Dr. Lempert regarding Dr. Nilsson's Editorial to our study of the extension of the period of bilateral visual impairment (BVI) in persons with untreated amblyopia, and the response by Dr. Nilsson. A slight misunderstanding may arise, however, from the first sentence of Dr. Lempert's letter: "It is not surprising that amblyopes are at higher risk of bilateral visual impairm...

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  • Sleep apnoea in the eye clinic
    Anju Kadyan

    Dear Editor,

    We agree with the authors’ recommendation on the need for a sleep history in the eye clinic and probably having a lower threshold for referral to sleep physicians for further sleep studies.[1] However, we would like to bring to their attention other epidemiological studies where screening tools/sleep history have shown a high prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with ocular disorders other than...

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  • Authors' reply
    William C. Stewart

    Dear editor,

    We want to thank Drs. Martinez and Sanchez for the response to our recent editorial. We are in agreement with them that evidence does exist that blood flow is altered in glaucoma and is suggestive of a pathogenetic role[1]. We also agree that a variety of methods are being used to evaluate blood flow and these techniques certainly have improved over the last decade and a half.

    I would also lik...

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  • Newcastle score in intermittent exotropia
    Siddharth Kesarwani

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Buck et al must be commended for this wonderful article[1] which takes us one step closer to deciding intervention based on Newcastle scoring system previously described.[2] However, we seek a few clarifications.

    1.Inclusion criteria: The authors have described the inclusion criteria for the study to be intermittent exotropia X(T)) of more than or equal to 20 prism dioptres (pd), for...

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