eLetters

675 e-Letters

  • Temporal incision in all eyes using dominant hand
    Venkatesh Rengaraj MD

    Dear Editor

    2 We read with keen interest the paper by Kageyama et al,[1] which analyzed the results of performing phacoemulsification with dominant versus non-dominant hand. The results were also interesting; vitreous loss was higher with dominant hand group (5.9% vs.3.4%) and opposite in case of endothelial cell loss. Even though vitreous loss has been similar to a few other reports of conventional superior inc...

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  • Economic Advantages of Immediate Sequential Phacoemulsification
    Venkatesh Rengaraj MD

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the article on immediate sequential phacoemulsification (ISP) by Wertheim et al.[1] Bilateral intraocular surgery has been a controversial topic for ophthalmologist because of the risk of bilateral catastrophic complications such as endophthalmitis. Unilateral cataract surgery may result in anisometropia which can be debilitating for a person who could have been performing fine...

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  • etiology of interstitial keratitis responding to acitretin?
    Mary J. van Schooneveld

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest your paper the effect of acitretin on interstitial keratitis. However, I am left with a few questions. First, you suggest the interstitial keratitis in your patient was due to tuberculosis, but you do not comment on diagnostics: was a PCR performed on aqueous fluid? was the button of the left eye in 1993 histologically examined? Secondly, on the photograph there seems to be a hypopyon p...

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  • Author's reply
    Monique J. Cordonnier

    Dear Editor

    Of course you must proceed to a cycloplegic refraction, otherwise you cannot be sure that the refractive error is purely astigmatic. The sign of the astigmatism may also change after cycloplegia. Moreover, be cautious about the cylinder value given by the Retinomax if the spherical ametropia is high.[1]

    Reference

    (1) How accurate is the hand-held refractor Retinomax in measuring cyclople...

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  • Non-penetrating gluacoma surgery
    Tarek M Shaarawy

    Dear Editor

    The authors of this article (Tan J C H, and Hitchings R. Non-penetrating glaucoma surgery: the state of play. Br J Ophthalmol 2001;85:234-237) should be commended on attempting to tackle this issue. Nevertheless we do feel that their fundamental points and principal arguments merit reconsideration.

    The authors state categorically that "long term outcomes do not exit for the newer...

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  • Non-cyclplegic reftaction in children
    Rashmi Mahajan

    Dear Editor

    A question: can we safely say that in children with pure astigmatism cycloplegic refraction is not required?

  • Mechanism of ophthalmic artery occlusion following pars plana vitrectomy
    Jay M Stewart

    Dear Editor

    Saito et al. present a patient with Terson’s syndrome and vitreous hemorrhage who underwent pars plana vitrectomy and was noted postoperatively to have developed an ophthalmic artery occlusion. They propose that the ophthalmic artery was occluded by the spontaneous release of an embolus from an atheromatous plaque in the internal carotid artery. This seems unlikely in a 39-year-old male without a...

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  • Implications on glaucoma management
    Oscar D. Albis

    Dear Editor

    The results presented here have a very important impact on the understanding of retinopathy of prematurity and its prevention. It also has several implications for glaucoma treatment. Several drugs have been trying to show a beneficial effect on ocular blood flow, but there are several limitations to the methods used. Dorzolamide is thought to have a potential benneficial effect on optic nerve head circulati...

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  • Further considerations in retinopathy with renal failure
    Moin D. Mohamed

    Dear Editor

    We were interested to read the letter by Patel et al. reporting the unusual and striking fundus appearance of retinal arteriolar calcification in association with chronic renal failure.[1] However, we feel that two important conditions have been omitted from the comment, which merit further discussion.

    First, Monckeberg’s sclerosis, which in its classic form is characterised by ‘pipe-stem’...

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  • Author Reply: Dynamics of corneal endothelial death in organ culture
    Gilles Thuret

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the remarks of Crowston et al. [1] on our article entitled "Value of two mortality assessment techniques for organ cultured corneal endothelium: trypan blue versus TUNEL technique".[2] We showed that the TUNEL technique revealed a far higher percentage of endothelial cells (ECs) irreversibly engaged in a cell death process than that obtained by trypan blue staining.

    ...

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