Table 5

Studies on myopia progression in teenagers and young adults

AuthorsPopulationDesignSample sizeMean age
(years)
Duration follow-up (years)Mean annual myopia progression
O’Neal and Connon33US Air Force cadetsRetrospective49717–212.5–0.23 D/y
Kinge and Midelfart34Engineering Norwegian studentsProspective22420.63–0.22 D/y
Jacobsen, Jensen and Goldschmidt35First year medical students (Danemark)Prospective14323.1–0.20 D/y
Lv and Zhang36 2013Medical students (China)Prospective205318.3–0.18 D/y
Polling, Klaver and Tideman21Children (prescription from opticians) (Netherlands)Retrospective2555Children and young adults up to 211–22 years (mean 5.8)
  • –0.50 D/y (children≤10 y)

  • –0.19 D/y (for 13–15 y)

  • –0.09 D/y (for 16–18 y)

  • –0.08 D/y (for 19–21 y)

French et al37Population-based (Australia)Prospective276012 and 17 years6–0.31 D/year*
Fan et al38School-based (Hong Kong)Prospective75605–16 (9.3)*–0.63 D/year
Zhou et al39Population-based (China)Prospective30706–155 years–0.71 D/year†
Current studyTeenagers and adults (France)Prospective167 204
(for 14–29 years)
Teenagers and young adults (21.4)7 years (mean 2.9)
  • –0.16 D/y (for 14–15 y)

  • –0.13 D/y (for 16–17 y)

  • –0.10 D/y (for 18–19 y)

  • –0.08 D/y (for 20–21 y)

  • *In the population of children aged 12 years at first examination.

  • †For myopic eyes at baseline.